The Burden of the Young

The burden of the Young is youth.

Youth means you don’t know what’s right. If you say the right thing, you’re “mature for your age”. If you do the wrong thing, you’re just too young to know better. If you share modernized, creative solutions for current and on-going problems, you’re an idealist and will “get it when you’re my age”.

Without years of experience, even college education means little when age is taken into consideration. Without years of living, regardless of what experiences that time provided, a young person lacks a depth of understanding of the world we live in.

It’s not fair.

We have brains, and *unless you’re saying the education system is a complete failure* we’ve been taught to use them. We’ve learned critical thinking skills, as well as how to information-gather on far larger scales than just a decade or two ago. We have innovative and creative ideas. For example, a girl in college grew mushrooms in her dorm room that were later turned into a complete green plastic-like packaging product that is highly biodegradable, non-toxic, and cheap. We’ve learned to adapt to our environment, to accept differences of opinion and practice; we proactively discuss sex, religion, and politics for fun! Once, those were topics you avoided talking to strangers about; now, they’re ice-breakers for the Young. We can agree to disagree. We can compromise. We bend instead of breaking.

We are phenomenally valuable as a natural resource, and we are being ignored.

That’s a lie. We’re viewed as bodies, not brains. The Young are recruited as fodder for political actions in other countries. And we die. Or we return, bodies broken and cynicism deeply rooted in our psyches. As a country, the United States is destroying its Young. We, the Young, cry out for help…

…because our voices, even together, are small. We are ignored like a fussy toddler.

Poll the age group of 18-30, and we have very specific views on what’s wrong, how to fix it, and where to compromise between party lines. To us, it’s *so simple*. Examples: Legalize marijuana, but tax it to death like tobacco and treat it like alcohol (no high-driving allowed, because you’re under the influence). Legalize gay marriage, then give all Justices of the Peace and pastors/preachers/churches the right to refuse to perform the ceremony (make the couples find someone willing, and no one unwilling will be “tainted” by the act). Stop trying to babysit the entire world (especially places like the Middle East, where there has *never* been peace); bring our soldiers home *for real* and work on our own economic and social woes (the cuts in spending would assist our retardly overgrown deficit).

Why is it so hard to grasp the obvious? Why are politicians on *both* sides failing to compromise?

Last year, when the budget was due and the debates were tight over items attached to it… WHY did the military mid-month paychecks get posted with a zero balance? It only lasted for a few hours, but why did our government go so far with it’s unwillingness to cooperate as to (for lack of a better phrase) screw over thousands of military members and their families? I sat here listening to my coworker, an army spouse, as she lived through the fear of making ends meet. It’s no rumor, or overblow media story; it’s a governmental failure that *I witnessed*.

I am Young. I don’t quite have my Associates Degree (which will be useless as is, but that’s a different rant). I’m voting for the first time this election, only my second opportunity to do so as a qualifying adult. I cooperatively live with two other working Young, which is the only reason I’m not on governmental or state assistance.

I don’t expect to have everything my way. I’ve a very liberal-minded, green-focused, polyamorous pagan person. There’s no way the whole country could conform to my personal beliefs, *nor do I expect them to*. There is only one expectation I hold that I can guarantee crosses all parties, all ages and races:

I expect communication, cooperation, and compromise between my elected representatives.

Maybe I’m naive, but I don’t think that’s too much to ask. Do you?

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